Tag: TravelBlogger

Airstream Adventures: Ruggable

image description: a silver airstream hooked up to a silver truck from a distance – the foreground and parking area are gravel and there are trees losing their fall leaves.

I’m afraid I’m not the first person to say this, but living in a tiny home on wheels is a dirty business. Even when we take our shoes off immediately upon entering Twinkie – there’s still going to be an abundance of dirt, leaves, and rocks depending on the weather, the time of year, and the environment you’re staying in. I have only encountered paved RV parks a few times and honestly, it takes something away from the appeal!

That being said, we also have two miniature schnauzers. Even if we’re only gone for a week, they have a tendency to get leaves stuck in their beards, and even though we don’t keep them in show style cuts with the finishings – they track in all sorts of things on their fur (usually leaves, thankfully not too hard to clean up).

image description: a blonde sitting in the doorway of an airstream with one salt and pepper schnauzer on her lap and a black and silver schnauzer laying beside her in the doorway.

Our current rug has been in this Airstream since we bought it. Airstreams are generally not carpeted, especially not the modern ones. Ours is no exception, with the flooring throughout being a light grey pebbled look. I bought the rug on a whim and I rather enjoy the colors although they don’t entirely take into account our decorating scheme – they are a medallion print in orange, tan, and grey.

We have worked hard to keep this typical rug clean over the years – we usually spray a diluted mix of Oxiclean and water on it and vacuum to dry – and obviously vacuum the worst of the dirt up often! (I will give a hearty support to Oxiclean, though! Our best friend spilled chinese food in the back of our then brand-new truck and Oxiclean got it out! We used precisely the method I mention above.)

That said, this rug has kind of worn out it’s welcome. It’s tired, and we’re tired of it after five years. I think that length of time means it’s probably acceptable to replace it. Enter, Ruggable. I saw my first Ruggable rug in either an RV showroom or a camping store and immediately knew this would solve so many problems! However, the color they had wasn’t great with our Serenity’s color scheme so I waited until I got home to look for a runner that would be a good fit. A peek at our current runner below (and color scheme).

Ruggable is a 2-piece rug system that consists of a removable, waterproof and stain-resistant Rug Cover and a nonslip Rug Pad. Finally, a rug you can actually throw in the washing machine! This is the thing the RV community has needed for years! Anyway, we checked them out online, here.

Below we have a selection of runners my partner and I have narrowed down to choose from – and here’s where we’re stuck! We like different runners for different reasons. So I am going to attach all three in a gallery, and then add links. You let me know in the comments which runner you would choose for our space!

If you’re interested in Ruggable, you can get a discount from them on your first order by following this link. And I might get a discount eventually too. Win-win.

Runner 1. Watercolor Floral Coral Rug.

Runner 2. Santa Fe Multicolor Rug.

Runner 3. Endah Multicolor Rug.

Truly, we would love your help making this decision! We love them all for different reasons. The first reminds me of what we currently have (though I have no idea why), the second is very reminiscent of our time and upbringing in the American Southwest, and the third, an ikat print, is my very favorite print that ever existed, but I’m not sure about it on a rug.

What do you think?! Would you use a Ruggable in your home? I’m looking forward to your input on my dilemma.

❤ Jennifer

ARTECHOUSE: Infinite Space

image description: photo of a shadowed person in a mirrored space, overlaid the image are the words ARTECHOUSE What You Need To Know: Especially If You’re Disabled.

If you’re a disabled person considering visiting ARTECHOUSE in Washington, D.C. here are a few things you will want to know before heading out and shelling out for a ticket.

First, the location is nondescript – the entrance is next door to chain restaurants well outside the typical D.C. center – don’t plan to walk to this museum from your stop at the Capital or the Lincoln Memorial.

Be prepared to do a lot of unusual standing and sitting. The foyer where you enter the museum is a small square space, all hard surfaces with only a few small benches. Everyone has to read and sign documents upon entering about understanding the nature of this exhibit – even before you get to see what it is, or have an idea what you’re agreeing to.

There is one elevator that services the museum, however, it is very small and as we are not wheelchair users, we were not able to absolutely tell if it was possible to get down to the museum level by elevator (or other accessible means).

When you get to the rooms where all the technological art is displayed – there are warnings at every doorway to let you know that if you have vertigo or any issues with flashing lights to not enter. I’m sure it was somewhere in the initial paperwork we signed as well, but it *is* disorienting if you ever have issues with balance or flashing lights. Be aware of this. I have vertigo and was mostly ok, but if I was having a bad day it would not have been the place for me.

The whole point of the exhibit was the special Infinite Space room, which required signing up again, and waiting for up to 30 minutes – for what was a mere 2 minutes in the exhibit – shut in with two or three other people you didn’t know. Something to be aware of. We ended up in the space alone because of being Deaf and having a lot of difficulty communicating with the staff members who were taking names and making phone calls for turns.

We did enjoy hanging out in the beanbags and getting kombucha at the bar.

image description: orange kombucha in a black futuristic goblet with a special ARTECHOUSE coaster underneath.

As the current iteration of ARTECHOUSE is data based, my computer programming partner looked over all the code he could see and was not impressed. We still enjoyed the overall experience, but if you’re knowledgeable about data and coding this might not be much fun for you.

All in all, it was an interesting experience – worth it for one trip – and probably not something we would ever venture out to see again.

Weekend Wander: Boulder

I have traveled to Boulder – both when I lived in Colorado – and several times since moving to Maryland. My best friend growing up lived in Boulder and a chosen family member lives fairly close now as well.

image is of light trails around a hairpin curve above Boulder Colorado’s city lights. Overlaid in white letters are the words Weekend Wander: Boulder, Colorado. Photo by Shiro hatori via Unsplash.

On your first morning in Boulder, I would take you out for brunch. The Buff is a Boulder institution. I would recommend a Homestead Skillet – and if you like it spicy, I’d go for the Ole since you’re in Colorado. It has chorizo, green chile, and jalapeños. If you love coffee, give the local Nitro Cold Brew a try. Or we could go for a breakfast burrito at Illegal Pete’s.

It’s famous for a reason! You shouldn’t miss Pearl Street. The downtown mall was designated The Downtown Boulder Mall in 1977. It also prohibited cars – and this made the mall more attractive to tourists and locals alike.

If you’re up for a treat we could check out the Boulder Dushanbe Teahouse for the location – as the teahouse is considered one of Boulder’s most attractive and popular tourist attractions. It is also a local favorite for good tea, food, and atmosphere. When I was in high school we would drive the hour across the front range just for tea and chicken salad!

Boulder has a fairly accessible trail system (if you can handle hills, anyway) on the Boulder Creek Paved Pathway – with 7 miles of paved path from the foothills all the way to the plains where you can get a taste of the landscape of Boulder.

You didn’t ask, but I’ll tell you that there are a bunch of must-dos and sees in Boulder! One of them is to take the Celestial Seasonings factory tour! The tour is wheelchair accessible and the factory has chairs on site. The Celestial Seasonings brand began in 1969 when one of the founders hand-picked herbs in the Rocky Mountains.

If you’re an outdoors person or you enjoy hiking, Boulder is the place to be for easy access to trails of all levels of difficulty. Chautauqua Park is full of trails and there is a trail map here. Unfortunately, there isn’t great indication on accessibility – only on use type and elevation.

Image description: a blonde with her hair up is posing in front of the final ascent to Royal Arch in the Flatirons.

My latest hike in Boulder was Royal Arch in the Boulder Flatirons. This is a 3 mile strenuous trail, that ends at a natural rock arch overlooking Boulder with a gorgeous view. It tends to be busy though (as evidenced by all the people in my photo above). I enjoyed the hike and the view made every step worthwhile.

Want to collaborate and share your city! Email me.

 ❤ Always, J.

Weekend Wander: Denver

I lived in Colorado up until I got married and moved away, so I will detail some places I know well as well as some places I have visited since moving in my Weekend Wander posts.

First things first, we start with food!

I’d take you out for brunch at Snooze, an A.M. Eatery. I would recommend the Juan’s Breakfast Tacos, or if you’re a Benedict fan, I love the Smashed Avocado Benny. The local cold brew coffee is also worth a try! Another option is Jelly Cafe, known as Capitol Hill’s hottest breakfast spot. Pro Tip: Grab some doughnut bites for the road!

If you’re in Denver, you definitely shouldn’t miss Red Rocks Park & Amphitheater. Even though it’s a bit of a drive! If you can go to a concert, it is an experience you will have almost no other place. I also personally love hiking around Red Rocks Park. Check out the shorter loop at Trading Post Trail. My partner and I got married at the Trading Post, there’s a really beautiful building with a scenic overlook.

If you’re up for a treat, we can check out Little Man Ice Cream – where ice cream is served from an actual milk jug. The banana pudding ice cream is somehow better than real banana pudding if you like things chilly! Bonus, for every scoop of ice cream purchased, Little Man matches that scoop with a donated scoop of rice, beans, or other essentials to a community in need anywhere around the world.

image description: a blonde wearing a striped dress and purple jacket and a redhead with a dark jacket and jeans sit on a bench in front of Little Man Ice Cream.

If you’re interested in history, you should not miss The Molly Brown House Museum (the home of the Unsinkable Molly Brown of the Titanic). The Molly Brown House Museum stands as an enduring symbol of the turn of the 20th century in Denver. Margaret Brown, never known as Molly during her lifetime, was a true activist, philanthropist and creator of cultural change. She helped create Colorado’s juvenile court system and was one of the first historic preservationists in the area. You can learn lots more about her here. Accessibility information for the museum is visible here.

Getting around Denver can be relatively simple, as there is a comprehensive bus system and an expanding light rail and commuter rail network. But if you really want to get to know the active, outdoors, and adventure-friendly city, you should hop on a bike from Denver’s community bicycles and ride around town.

You didn’t ask, but I will tell you that a trip to Denver wouldn’t be complete without checking out one of the many historic railroad locations. If you’re in Denver proper, you absolutely must check out Denver’s Union Station – a historic destination over 100 years old. The Great Hall pays homage to the pioneer spirit that started it all, while still being modern and beautiful. If you’re hanging out in Golden after visiting Red Rocks Park, go check out the Colorado Railroad Museum. Here you can learn everything there is to know about Colorado’s rich railroad history.

A few other must-sees: Larimer Square, Clear Creek Riverwalk in Golden (it’s pretty accessible), several murals by artist Kelsey Montague of #WhatLiftsUs – one #WhatUnitesUs is/was on the east facing wall of Il Posto at 26th and Larimer, and a whole list of the murals is here.

Want to collaborate and share your city! Email me.

❤ Always, J.